Selma’s Historic Pilgrimage

Belles and blossoms graced the city of Selma as Alabama’s largest historic district opened its doors to sites rarely seen by the public for the 41st annual Historic Selma Pilgrimage on Friday, March 18 and Saturday, March 19, 2016. Spring Pilgrimage offered visitors a chance to experience hands-on history through guided tours of antebellum homes, museums, and more.

Seven homes that spanned more than a century of history and architectural styles were open to the public for the 41st Historic Selma Pilgrimage.  The press release follows.

“Guests will be inspired by Selma’s vision for preservation and the diversity of architecture with homes built from the 1830s to the mid-1950s,” said Pilgrimage Chairman Greg Bjelke. “Some homes are new to Pilgrimage, and others are old favorites with new owners,” he added. Three houses are in the midst of major renovations so that visitors can view the transformation. Others are in pristine condition.

McEachern 619 Dallas Ave. 2 WebThe homes tour is located entirely in the downtown historic district, the largest in Alabama, and many venues are within walking distance of each other.

Several other events coincide with Pilgrimage. They include the Alabama Plein Air Artists who will “paint the town” on location and sell their works at the Selma Art Guild and ArtsRevive’s acclaimed Alabama Artists’ Roots and Wings Art Exhibition.

An evening home tour and reception entertains guests on Friday evening followed by a “Ghost Walk” through the enchanting Old Live Oak Cemetery on Saturday evening. The 1860’s Kenan’s Mill takes visitors back in time along Valley Creek, and four museums with displays depicting Selma’s history from Civil War to Civil Rights are open.

Sturdivant Hall Foyer webTours include the seven homes, two churches, Kenan’s Mill, Sturdivant Hall, Vaughan-Smitherman Museum, Old Depot Museum, Selma Civil Rights Interpretive Center, Old Live Oak Cemetery “Ghost Walk,” ArtsRevive’s Spring Art Exhibition, Selma Art Guild and Alabama Plein Air Artists Show and Sale.

Stop by Pilgrimage Headquarters from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Vaughan-Smitherman Museum (109 Union St.) for tickets and refreshments, then experience southern hospitality through guided tours.

Visitors will want to spend a night or two so they can enjoy all that Selma has to offer. Visit our website to find more information about our event as well as valuable discount offers at select lodging facilities and restaurants.

Sponsored by the Selma-Dallas County Historic Preservation Society, Pilgrimage began in 1976 as a way to recognize and share the city’s variety of architectural styles and rich history. As one of the state’s oldest cities, Selma’s historic district features more than 1200 structures. Selma is located 50 miles west of Montgomery on U.S. 80 and 90 miles south of Birmingham on Alabama 22. It can also be reached via Alabama 14 just a 45-minute drive west of Prattville.

Package tickets can be purchased during the event at Pilgrimage Headquarters (Vaughan-Smitherman Museum, 109 Union St). Individual tickets can be purchased at each site.

For more information, call 334-412-8550, visit the website, call 800-45-SELMA (800-457-3562) or write to the Selma-Dallas County Historic Preservation Society, P.O. Box 586, Selma, AL 36702-0586.

A century of architectural styles awaits visitors to Selma’s 35th Historic Pilgrimage. Nine homes built from the 1820s to the 1920s are on tour, most of them in the Old Town Historic District.
Home styles vary from an antebellum Greek Revival that bears scars of the Civil War to a rambling “Free Classic” Victorian that once served as a house church to a cozy 1920’s Tudor cottage surrounded by gardens.
Visitors can spend a couple of days to see them all or opt for a one-day tour of four homes. Come early on Thursday and take part in the late-night investigation of paranormal activity in a Neo-Classic mansion, or stay Friday night and tour the house following the ghost tour in Old Live Oak Cemetery.A century of architectural styles awaits visitors to Selma’s 35th Historic Pilgrimage. Nine homes built from the 1820s to the 1920s are on tour, most of them in the Old Town Historic District.
Home styles vary from an antebellum Greek Revival that bears scars of the Civil War to a rambling “Free Classic” Victorian that once served as a house church to a cozy 1920’s Tudor cottage surrounded by gardens.
Visitors can spend a couple of days to see them all or opt for a one-day tour of four homes. Come early on Thursday and take part in the late-night investigation of paranormal activity in a Neo-Classic mansion, or stay Friday night and tour the house following the ghost tour in Old Live Oak Cemetery.