Selma’s Historic Pilgrimage 2019

SPRING PILGRIMAGE IN SELMA. The very words conjure up images of flowering beauty and historic homes dating back to the early 1800’s. We invite you to come and experience history from the Civil War to Civil Rights as you tour private homes, museums, gardens and much more. You’ll be enchanted with Selma’s special blend of Southern graces and historic places and the largest historic district in Alabama.

Tourists from throughout the state, and the world at large, are fascinated with the diverse history and architecture found in Selma, and you will be too. Our Pilgrimage encompasses antebellum houses and industry, Victorian cottages, museums, and a with accompanying stories guaranteed to enthrall visiting pilgrims. Selma was burned in 1865 by Wilson’s Raiders and our surviving antebellum homes are cherished and waiting to be admired and shared during Pilgrimage.

Selma’s Pilgrimage draws visitors from near and far to experience its diverse history and architecture. Angie Detoro is among those who attends almost every year. She has come to the Selma Pilgrimage for the past 10 years. “I drive from Colorado to Tennessee to pick up my mom and sister, then continue the drive to Alabama. We love the beautiful architectural history of Selma. We appreciate the efforts of the Selma Pilgrimage Committee who make this possible, as well as the countless volunteers we have met over the years and the individuals who so graciously open their lovely homes for the tour.

Stop by Pilgrimage Headquarters from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Vaughan-Smitherman Museum (109 Union St.) for tickets and refreshments, then experience southern hospitality through guided tours.

Visitors will want to spend a night or two so they can enjoy all that Selma has to offer. Visit our website to find more information about our event as well as valuable discount offers at select lodging facilities and restaurants.

Sponsored by the Selma-Dallas County Historic Preservation Society, Pilgrimage began in 1976 as a way to recognize and share the city’s variety of architectural styles and rich history. As one of the state’s oldest cities, Selma’s historic district features more than 1200 structures. Selma is located 50 miles west of Montgomery on U.S. 80 and 90 miles south of Birmingham on Alabama 22. It can also be reached via Alabama 14 just a 45-minute drive west of Prattville.

Package tickets can be purchased during the event at Pilgrimage Headquarters (Vaughan-Smitherman Museum, 109 Union St). Individual tickets can be purchased at each site.

For more information, call 334-412-8550, visit the website, call 800-45-SELMA (800-457-3562) or write to the Selma-Dallas County Historic Preservation Society, P.O. Box 586, Selma, AL 36702-0586.

A century of architectural styles awaits visitors to Selma’s 35th Historic Pilgrimage. Nine homes built from the 1820s to the 1920s are on tour, most of them in the Old Town Historic District.
Home styles vary from an antebellum Greek Revival that bears scars of the Civil War to a rambling “Free Classic” Victorian that once served as a house church to a cozy 1920’s Tudor cottage surrounded by gardens.
Visitors can spend a couple of days to see them all or opt for a one-day tour of four homes. Come early on Thursday and take part in the late-night investigation of paranormal activity in a Neo-Classic mansion, or stay Friday night and tour the house following the ghost tour in Old Live Oak Cemetery.A century of architectural styles awaits visitors to Selma’s 35th Historic Pilgrimage. Nine homes built from the 1820s to the 1920s are on tour, most of them in the Old Town Historic District.
Home styles vary from an antebellum Greek Revival that bears scars of the Civil War to a rambling “Free Classic” Victorian that once served as a house church to a cozy 1920’s Tudor cottage surrounded by gardens.
Visitors can spend a couple of days to see them all or opt for a one-day tour of four homes. Come early on Thursday and take part in the late-night investigation of paranormal activity in a Neo-Classic mansion, or stay Friday night and tour the house following the ghost tour in Old Live Oak Cemetery.